William Tempest Fashion Label

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Designer Women’s Fashion by William Tempest

View William Tempest Fashion collections on London Fashion Review Blog

William Tempest British Women's Fashion Label

Designer William Tempest: A Brief History

William Tempest is a contemporary British womenswear brand based in London, focused on creating innovative cuts and new, unique silhouettes on well constructed garments. At the age of 18, Tempest moved to London to study womenswear design at The London College of Fashion. He spent time working with fellow designers Giles Deacon and Jean Charles de Castelbajac before launching his label under his own name in 2009. A relatively new brand, William Tempest has achieved accolades from the Global Fashion Awards and the Vauxhall Fashion Scouts. Furthermore, Tempest has already collaborated with British department store John Lewis, electronic giant Sony for its laptop VAIO range, The Body Shop and shoe designer Merchante of London.

Tempest has gained a strong celebrity following; fans include Emma Watson, Jamil, Leona Lewis, Victoria Beckham, Lily Allen and Kate Moss.

  • 2008: The first William Tempest line is launched as part of London Fashion Week’s Fashion Fringe. Additionally, Tempest is the first Vauxhall Fashion Scouts first Merit Award winner. The winner of the Merit Award receives a fully equipped catwalk, PR and sales support, and a specialised mentoring program spread over three seasons. His Vauxhall Fashion Scouts show is attended by high profile guests including Emma Watson, Jade Parfitt and Jasmine Guinness.
  • 2009: William Tempest is launched as a brand and he designs a laptop case for Sony VAIO, which sponsors his fall 2009 runway show.
  • 2010: Design collaboration with John Lewis is launched in John Lewis stores throughout the UK, including in the flagship store on London’s Oxford Street. Additionally, William Tempest receives the Global Fashion Award for Emerging Brand.
  • 2011: Shows for the first time at New York Fashion Week with his Spring/Summer 2011 collection. William Tempest curates the design category at the smart Future Minds Exhibition. Launches collaboration with The Body Shop called ‘Brush with Fashion’ by lending his designs to the campaigns marketing campaign.

British fashion designer William Tempest

Designer William Tempest

Inspirations for William Tempest Fashion Collections

William Tempest derives his inspiration from a wide variety of sources.

“There’s creative inspiration everywhere you look – from fashion to literature. I find it inspiring to look at innovative and experimental design and take influences from the construction of objects myself” – William Tempest

  • Autumn/Winter 2009/10: The collection was based on indulgence and took it’s inspiration from the over-indulgent Tudor era. Iconic paintings of Elizabeth I and Henry VIII had been deconstructed and added as print details to regally stiff dresses that were the stars of the collection. Influence for the heavily-structured garments came from the architectural details of Hampton Court Palace.
  • Spring/Summer 2010: The ‘A View to a Kill’ was a collection heavily inspired by ‘Bond Girls’ and Ian Fleming’s glamorous espionage-themed tales. The collection consisted of super-sculpted and seductive garments that celebrated the female form, including a dress that was tailored for the more fuller-figured model.
  • Autumn/Winter 2010/11: Islamic architecture and the legend of Queen Sheeba’s journey to Israel was the inspiration behind the ‘Under the Abaya’ collection. Referencing the structured lines of modern architecture, the collection was punkier, edgier and rougher than what had been shown before. Shoes were also showcased on the runway, new for this season, in collaboration with Merchante of London.
  • Spring/Summer 2011: The first collection to be shown at New York Fashion Week was inspired by mythical sirens as interpreted by British pre-Raphaelite artists. The garments were a palette of coral, pale grey and lemon, and were an eclectic mixture of period-looking wave-inspired dresses and contemporary figure hugging mini dresses. Tempest’s ongoing collaboration with Mechante of London meant that footwear was also on show in styles that complimented the collection.
  • Autumn/Winter 2011/12: Tempest decided against a catwalk show this year, instead deciding to produce a promotional video showcasing his collection. Witchcraft, the occult and the macabre was the inspiration for this collection, more specifically the drowning ritual performed on suspected witches.

Designer women's clothing by William Tempest

‘Dia Anna’: A Collaboration with Merchante of London

For the Autumn/Winter 2011/12 season, William Tempest decided against a catwalk campaign, deciding instead to use the media of film to showcase the witch inspired collection with collaborators of the previous few seasons, Merchante of London. Tempest and Deborah Lyons of London, together with director Patrick Lindblom and art directors Egelnick and Webb created the short film Dia Anna starring model Amber Le Bon. The film characterises the shared aesthetic between the brands for the 2011/12 Autumn/Winter collections, both of which are inspired by the macabre, occult and witchcraft. The film can be viewed in full on the sites of William Tempest and Merchante of London.

 

The Future of William Tempest

The brand has been a popular feature in many fashion magazines including Vogue and In Style, and has been worn by celebrities in many high profile events – surely increasing the brand’s position on the fashion radar. Currently stocked in high quality boutiques throughout the globe, including Harrods in London, Boutique 1 in Dubai and Folli Follie in Italy, the brand has been highly successful since its launch in 2009. In the future, further brand expansion and increased collaborations would be expected.

To take a full look at the recent collections of William Tempest, visit the official William Tempest website

Designer women's clothing by William Tempest

Designer women's clothing by William Tempest

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